Weir Works

Whatstandwell Weir Works
February 2014

Whatstandwell Weir is owned by the Environment Agency and is used to measure river levels both at low flows for drought monitoring and at high flows for flood forecasting.

The River Derwent is a great river, but it could be better.  One of the main issues is all the barriers to fish migration, such as weirs, which are preventing fish completing their life cycle.

Whatstandwell Weir has been prioritised for a fish pass based on its potential to open up 45 miles of the River Derwent to all species of migratory fish.  The fish pass is part of an overall strategy for the Derwent to maximise the habitat length for all species.  There are already fish passes or proposals in place for Church Wilne, Longbridge and Darley Abbey and Duffield on the Ecclesbourne and Wingfield Park on the Amber.

At Whatstandwell, the plan is for a bypass larinier fish pass on the right bank and pumped eel pass on the left bank although depending on ground conditions they may be both on the same bank.  The bypass larinier fish pass will circumvent the weir and resemble, in form and function, a side channel or natural tributary of the main river.  It will use a series of symmetrical close-spaced baffles on the bed of the pass which will allow fish to more easily pass up the channel.

Construction is due to start in January 2014 and is expected to be completed by the end of March.  The contractors are VBA consortium (VolkerStevin Ltd, Boskalis Westminster Ltd, Atkins Ltd), working on behalf of the Environment Agency.

Whatstandwell Weir Works
February 2014

Whatstandwell Weir is owned by the Environment Agency and is used to measure river levels both at low flows for drought monitoring and at high flows for flood forecasting.

The River Derwent is a great river, but it could be better.  One of the main issues is all the barriers to fish migration, such as weirs, which are preventing fish completing their life cycle.

Whatstandwell Weir has been prioritised for a fish pass based on its potential to open up 45 miles of the River Derwent to all species of migratory fish.  The fish pass is part of an overall strategy for the Derwent to maximise the habitat length for all species.  There are already fish passes or proposals in place for Church Wilne, Longbridge and Darley Abbey and Duffield on the Ecclesbourne and Wingfield Park on the Amber.

At Whatstandwell, the plan is for a bypass larinier fish pass on the right bank and pumped eel pass on the left bank although depending on ground conditions they may be both on the same bank.  The bypass larinier fish pass will circumvent the weir and resemble, in form and function, a side channel or natural tributary of the main river.  It will use a series of symmetrical close-spaced baffles on the bed of the pass which will allow fish to more easily pass up the channel.

Construction is due to start in January 2014 and is expected to be completed by the end of March.  The contractors are VBA consortium (VolkerStevin Ltd, Boskalis Westminster Ltd, Atkins Ltd), working on behalf of the Environment Agency.

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